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Portus

Festival of British Archaeology

It is less than a week until the start of the Festival of British Archaeology - and we will be holding lots of events, both on and off-campus, during 2 weeks of the Festival. Everything kicks off with an Archaeology Activity Day this Saturday 11th July. Just drop in to take part in a series of hands-on activities related to aspects of archaeology within the department. Continue reading →

Visit to Portus by the Minister of Culture

From left to right – Minister Franceschini, Renato Sebastiani (SSBAR, Inspector Portus), Gabriela Strano (SSBAR, Medio ambiente), Sindaco (Mayor) Fiumicino and Simon Keay The ongoing Portus Project excavations being undertaken under the aegis of the second season of the Portus Field School were the object of a recent visit by the Italian Minister of Culture last week. Continue reading →

New Discoveries at Ostia Antica and the Isola Sacra

  David Knight undertaking magnetometry in the vicinity of the Tiber levee on the Isola Sacra in 2008 The new discovery of extensive urban remains to the north of the river Tiber at Ostia Antica http://www.portusproject.org/blog/2014/04/new-city-wall-discovered-ostia/#.U063XyX5rTc.twitter highlights part of the survey project conducted between 2008 and 2012 across the Isola Sacra, the area of delta between Ostia Antica and Portus. Continue reading →

New city wall discovered at Ostia

Newly discovered features at Ostia (Satellite imagery courtesy of Digital Globe Inc) Researchers from the universities of Southampton and Cambridge have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously estimated. The team, led by Professor Simon Keay (Southampton) and Professor Martin Millet (Cambridge), has been conducting a survey of an area of land lying between Ostia and Portus. Continue reading →

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles at Portus

Parrot AR Drone at Portus Since the start of excavations by the Portus Project in 2007, aerial photography has played an important role in the recording, analysis and presentation of the research. The ability for the archaeologist to have a bird’s-eye view of an excavation gives the opportunity to see the plan of structures, their relationships with each and alignments which are not visible at ground level. Continue reading →