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Week one – imagining the Claudian port

Rose surveying on site; an experienced archaeologist who uses art as another means to explore archaeological process and data. Photo: Hembo Pagi It has been a fantastic first week for us all involved in the course. Above all, we have been so grateful for the depth and breadth of comments, and for your enthusiasm for the course. If you are reading this and haven’t yet signed up then please do – there is still time to join in the conversations from week one and move on to week two. Continue reading →

Italian translation of week one topics

Excavating a burial at PortusPhoto: Hembo Pagi Eleonora has translated the summaries of the week one activities into Italian in order to support sharing of the course via Italian social media. As discussed previously the course itself runs in English and it is not possible to moderate the posts in English and Italian. This would require Italian speakers on the FutureLearn platform which is monitored 24 hours a day. So, we will continue to provide additional resources such as this where possible. Continue reading →

Welcome to Week One – the Port of Claudius

Frame from one of Simon Keay’s videos filmed at Portus last summer The course has just now become available! We have been working on this for a while now so it is good to be able to share the course with you properly. As you will now see the course is structured thematically, temporally and spatially. Each week we will discuss archaeological methods, object types, and also theoretical concerns. Continue reading →

Annotating RTI data in 3d and 2d

I’ve been talking to a lot people in recent months about annotation frameworks for RTI and today’s introduction to the #rodeimagingevent (see Hembo’s blog post) has crystalised some of these. I was talking to @kathrynpiquette about annotation and I also tweeted a query to @iipimage about it. @portableant suggested annotorious (something that I know our current MSc student Vassilis Valergas has been examining) and also openCanvas was suggested. Continue reading →

New city wall discovered at Ostia

Newly discovered features at Ostia (Satellite imagery courtesy of Digital Globe Inc) Researchers from the universities of Southampton and Cambridge have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously estimated. The team, led by Professor Simon Keay (Southampton) and Professor Martin Millet (Cambridge), has been conducting a survey of an area of land lying between Ostia and Portus. Continue reading →

Burying the Digital

Clay tablet (wikipedia) I am at Museums and the Web this week in Baltimore. I was sat next to @trinkermedia and we were talking enthusiastically about  the physical, tangible and the interactive digital (as usual). Over the last few years we have been digitising very large collections of cuneiform tablets and are mid way through developing an open source Reflectance Transformation Imaging web renderer that will allow interaction with these on mobile devices and desktops. Continue reading →

Italian language on the MOOC

The FutureLearn platform that is hosting the Archaeology of Portus MOOC currently does not support multiple languages, although we understand that this is being considered as the platform continues to develop. However, the Portus Project is at its heart a long term collaboration between Italian and UK institutions and individuals and so it is important to us that both languages are supported. Continue reading →

My Archaeologist is an App

Talking at a University of Southampton seminar from Portus (Flickr – Hembo Pagi) I’ve now listened to the second of the excellent programmes by @Sarah_Montague on @BBCRadio4 about the revolution in educational technology, and also the interesting discussion this morning on @BBCr4today between Professor Mary Beard (Cambridge), Professor Martin Bean (VC of the Open University) and Sarah Montague. Continue reading →