Primary School Activities

Here are some of the worksheets and resources we’ve made which relate to the primary school curriculum. All of these are in PDF format and are here for you to print and use. There are both resources for teachers to use themselves, to either further their knowledge or boost their confidence in taking classes outside. Many of the worksheets are applicable across several year groups, depending on ability, and how much detail you want to do.

For teachers

The school ground spotter sheet- these sheets have information about all the plants you may find on your school grounds, and some facts about them, designed to help teachers know what their school grounds contain. This can be found here.

Under the EIGS Guide tab, there are more documents focussed on assisting new or unconfident teachers in how to easily take classes outside.

We have split the KS1 and 2 UK National Curriculum into 3 sections which relate to environmental topics that we have developed worksheets or activities for. These sections are; Identification of plants and animals, Habitats and Food Chains, and the Structure and Function of Living Things. See below for the curriculum links and worksheets. At the bottom of the page you can also see the practical activities we have come up with. These all have strong curriculum links listed on the sheets.

Identification and classification of plants and animals

National Curriculum links:

  • Identify and name a variety of wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees (Year 1) 
  • identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals (Year 1) 
  • explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive (Year 2) 
  • identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats (Year 2) 
  • compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties (Year 3) 
  • recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways (Year 4) 
  • explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment (Year 4) 
  • describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals (Year 6) 
  • give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics (Year 6) 

The following worksheets relate to these topics;

school-ground-spotter-sheet –Can you find all these things in your school playground? A spotter’s sheet for children to explore an outdoor space, designed to incorporate things that are likely to be found in most school grounds.

plant-hunter– An outdoor activity exploring plants and the difference between deciduous and evergreen trees.

classification-worksheet– The first half challenges pupils to decide on the physical differences between mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. The second half provides pictures of animals for pupils to work out which group each animal belongs to. 

seeing-trees–  A fun focus on the function and structure of trees that encourages pupils to explore trees through use of senses, drawing and questioning. 

guess-who-garden-birds -A game to familiarize children (and adults!) with common garden birds, based on the game ‘Guess Who’.

life-cycles-worksheet– Draw the stages of the butterfly’s life cycle. (You could always use crafts such as tissue paper or pasta shapes to create these).

Habitats and food chains

National curriculum links:

  • describe how animals obtain their food form plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food (Year 2) 
  • identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other (Year 2) 
  • identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats (Year 2) 
  • explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant (Year 3) 
  • construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey (Year 4) 
  • recognize that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago (Year 6) 
  • identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution (Year 6) 

The following worksheets relate to these topics;

habitat-detectives– Put your detective hat on and have a think about what animals might live in the different habitats in the pictures.

foodchain-worksheet– A simple explanation of food chains with drawing space to create your own and add further terminology if needed.

hungry-herbivores-and-crazy-carnivores– A drawing exercise that focuses on the difference between herbivores, carnivores and omnivores.

Fantastic Beasts and Curious Carnivores A short premade field book encompassing classification (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish), herbivores, omnivores and carnivores, and drawing a food chain.

Structure and Function of Living Things

National curriculum links:

  • identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants including trees (Year 1) 
  • explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive (Year 2) 
  • identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers (Year 3) 
  • investigate the way in which water is transported within plants (Year 3) 

plant-hunter– An outdoor activity exploring plants and the difference between deciduous and evergreen trees.

classification-worksheet– The first half challenges pupils to decide on the physical differences between mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. The second half provides pictures of animals for pupils to work out which group each animal belongs to. 

seeing-trees–  A fun focus on the function and structure of trees that encourages pupils to explore trees through use of senses, drawing and questioning. 

Practical Activities

nature-tableOnce a staple in most classrooms the nature table is a simple, but effective, idea that can provide pupils with a visual and hands on experience of nature within the classroom.

life-cycles-worksheet– Draw the stages of the butterfly’s life cycle. (You could always use crafts such as tissue paper or pasta shapes to create these).

guess-who-garden-birds -A game to familiarize children (and adults!) with common garden birds, based on the game ‘Guess Who’.

bird-feeder-experiment -A simple experiment to encourage scientific thinking, observation and recording skills, whilst engaging pupils with nature. It can be pitched at various levels and include thoughts about what an animal needs to survive, identification, or even adaptations.

box-of-curiosities A great way to bring nature into the classroom is to create a box of curiosities that can sit on display or be brought out for pupils to interact with.

field-book –A field book or nature diary is a useful tool for keeping track of pupil’s progress during outdoor sessions, as well as giving them something to refer to and be proud of.

Fantastic Beasts and Curious Creatures– A short premade field book encompassing classification (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish), herbivores, omnivores and carnivores, and drawing a food chain.