Plagiarism

Plagiarism is when you present someone else’s words, ideas, theories or data as your own. It is academic dishonesty if you do not identify or properly reference the source from which you have taken information, you may be guilty of plagiarism. This can occur deliberately or accidentally whenever you do not acknowledge the author.  Plagiarism is one aspect of the wider concept of academic integrity; find out more about academic integrity.

How to avoid plagiarism

The best way to avoid plagiarism is to properly reference your work. This means acknowledging the source or sources from which you have acquired information. Respect the ideas and work of others and acknowledge these in your writing.  

This can be done in the following ways: 

  • When carrying out research, be organised, accurate and keep track of your sources as you go along 
  • Keep comprehensive notes and details for each source you have read 
  • In writing, explicitly acknowledge the source for quotations 
  • In writing, explicitly acknowledge also the source(s) when paraphrasing words, ideas, or arguments 
  • Be familiar with your referencing style

Plagiarism summary points 

  • Plagiarism is when you present someone else’s words, ideas, theories or data as your own. 
  • You can also be guilty of plagiarism however, even when you reuse your own work e.g. from a previous assignment. 
  • The University treats plagiarism as a serious offence. 
  • Plagiarism is best avoided by properly referencing the source(s) from which you have taken information. 

 

Now move to the next page Quiz – Plagiarism

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