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Reflectance Transformation Imaging

Student Research: Recording Church Graffiti

Vicky Man is currently an undergraduate Archaeology student. She dug at Basing House in 2013, and is now coming into her third year at the University of Southampton. Vicky has been working on her major project since the beginning of the summer and spent the field season this year with us at Basing House collecting data for her research and working with staff and volunteers to think about how to tackle her fascinating topic. Vicky has written a blog post introducing her research. Continue reading →

Conservation Project at Maori Meeting House

Recording Hinemihi using Computational Photography On Sunday the 23rd June 2013, a team from the University of Southampton took part in Hinemihiā€™s annual Maintenance Day. Using cameras, combined with new computational photography techniques, the team recorded some interesting details of Hinemihi. Hinemihi is a Maori Meeting House, one of only four outside of New Zealand. Hinemihi is situated in the grounds of Clandon Park, a National Trust managed site. Continue reading →

Icons RTI case study

Icons: ProductionĀ  techniques and examination methodology Icon or ikon from Greek eikōn is a representation of a sacred or sanctified Christian personage used in religious worship in the Russian or Greek Orthodox Church. The production of icons has been described by the monk Dionisios ek Fourna in 1728-1733. Icons are typically painted on a wooden panel with the egg tempera painting technique, over a layer of gypsum and glue (preparation layer). Continue reading →

Late Bronze Age Stelae, Craftspeople and Digital Technologies: Some Recent Explorations

Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) is revealing itself as a very powerful tool to examine prehistoric rock art. Through the application of different filters and the manipulation of the incidence of light, RTI provides an enhanced visual experience of the micro-topography of engraved stones, enabling the detection of subtle details that are difficult, at times impossible, to be seen through other recording techniques. Continue reading →