Dr Paul Richmond

Paul Richmond         (University of Sheffield)

Could you tell us a little about yourself and how you became a Research Software Engineer?

I have been working as a Research Associate (early career research) since I completed my PhD in 2010. During this time I have been working on the fringe of both novel computer science research and the application of emerging parallel computing architectures to various areas of science and engineering. Whilst carving a reasonably successful career as an early career researcher it became clear that in order to progress within the academic environment it would require me to become more specialised in novel research than to participate in applying my skills of parallel computing to broader research domains. The role of the research software engineer is one that means different things to different people. For me it is the role of applying my specialist skills of parallel computing to a wide range of domains. It is a position which encourages the development of my novel research software (FLAME GPU) giving me the flexibility to embed it as broadly as possible.

What do you think is the role of a Research Software Engineer? Is it different from a ‘normal’ researcher?

To me the role of RSE is one which is about facilitating research. This can be through hands on help or the provision of software, skills or a community which provides a specific researching computing need. Having worked both as a researcher and in my new role as a self recognised RSE my view is that it is important that people are able to transcend the boundary between the two. Many RSEs come from support backgrounds rather than research however there are countless researchers who work on providing research software or multi-disciplinary research computing skills. I feel that researchers should be encouraged to move into the roles of RSEs where appropriate but also that this shouldn’t be seen as a career limiting move. RSEs should be free to transition back into academia as a when the research requests it. I hope to demonstrate throughout my position as a RSE Fellow that it is possible to exist alongside this boundary delivering typical academic outputs whilst working collaboratively in a facilitation role.

You’ve recently won an EPSRC RSE Fellowship – congratulations! Can you give a brief overview of your project?

My RSE Fellowship is all about changing the way people think about coding and the way in which they use workstation and HPC computing. In the future computers will be highly parallel with hugh numbers of cores, we are already seeing this pattern emerge today through accelerated computing in the form of GPUs. The traditional “serial” was of thinking needs to change and parallelism needs to be incorporated into computational research from the ground up to enable researchers to target future computing systems. To ensure that this happens my fellowship proposed 1) a combination of software and tools targeting many core architectures, 2) upskilling of researchers on a national scale and embedding of parallel programming techniques within the undergraduate, and postgraduate curriculums and 3) a local and national community in which researchers can receive software consultancy and work collaboratively to embed accelerated computing into their research. As a result of this fellowship researchers will gain access to unprecedented levels of compute performance enabling them utilise scalable computational approaches to solve scientific chand challenges.