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Archaeological science and computing, Page 2

Visit to Portus by the Minister of Culture

From left to right – Minister Franceschini, Renato Sebastiani (SSBAR, Inspector Portus), Gabriela Strano (SSBAR, Medio ambiente), Sindaco (Mayor) Fiumicino and Simon Keay The ongoing Portus Project excavations being undertaken under the aegis of the second season of the Portus Field School were the object of a recent visit by the Italian Minister of Culture last week. Continue reading →

Fun and Games at Southampton Archaeology Activities Day

As part of the British Festival of Archaeology, people of all ages (from 3 to over 70) enjoyed a series of archaeological activities in the department on Saturday! While younger children excavated a coffin ‘burial’ complete with grave goods such as jewellery and Roman ceramics, older children explored the use of virtual reality and CGI within museums and the heritage industry. A quiz was held in which people worked out what different ceramics might have been used for (e.g. Continue reading →

Annotating RTI data in 3d and 2d

I’ve been talking to a lot people in recent months about annotation frameworks for RTI and today’s introduction to the #rodeimagingevent (see Hembo’s blog post) has crystalised some of these. I was talking to @kathrynpiquette about annotation and I also tweeted a query to @iipimage about it. @portableant suggested annotorious (something that I know our current MSc student Vassilis Valergas has been examining) and also openCanvas was suggested. Continue reading →

Papyrus RTI case study

The Derveni tombs discovered in 1962 close to Thessaloniki in North Greece are considered one of the most significant archaeological sites in northern Greece because of their numerous rich grave offerings and their important location in the ancient Mygdonian city of Lete, on the pass of Via Egnatia. The cemetery comprises seven graves, and according to the excavation publication dates to 320–290 BC. Continue reading →

Imaging Event/Hackathon

Few days to go to Rode Imaging Event where ACRG will be represent on power of three: Graeme Earl, James Miles and me. List of presenters at the seminar and workshop day include specialist with different expertise: multispectral imaging, 3D data acquisition and processing and theoretical approach. Hackathon weekend is supported by Garage48, people specialised in hackathons and helping start-ups. Continue reading →

Scanning the Folkton Drums

I am currently working on a project looking at the art of portable Neolithic artefacts from Britain and Ireland. One of the remarkable findings so far is the degree to which markings on these artefacts have been erased and reworked. This is especially true of chalk artefacts. These processes of reworking provide important information about craft techniques, and the significance of art and imagery in this period of prehistory. Continue reading →

Modelling Complexity

A Fractal Flame Complexity has become a new paradigm in the hard sciences in the 90s and since then it has been slowly dripping into the social sciences and humanities. It works on the premises that many systems are complex in structure, i.e. their numerous individual parts interact with each other in a non-linear way producing phenomena which cannot be easily predicted solely on the basis of their characteristics. Continue reading →

New city wall discovered at Ostia

Newly discovered features at Ostia (Satellite imagery courtesy of Digital Globe Inc) Researchers from the universities of Southampton and Cambridge have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously estimated. The team, led by Professor Simon Keay (Southampton) and Professor Martin Millet (Cambridge), has been conducting a survey of an area of land lying between Ostia and Portus. Continue reading →